Antarctica Episode Five: The Photographs

For those of you just joining us, I recently returned from a week-long expedition to Antarctica. Since coming back to civilization, I’ve been posting about the experience. In previous “episodes,” I presented a preview, talked about the Wildlifethe History, and the Science. Today, I’m sharing some of my favorite photos from the trip.

There’s really not a lot to write about photography. So, instead, I’ll just post some of my favorite pictures I happened to capture.

Our little BAe-146 that took us from South America to King George Island was quite photogenic.

If you know me, you know I love planes. So the little BAe-146 that took us from South America to King George Island was quite photogenic in my opinion.

While kayaking, we got close enough to get a sense of the ice.

While kayaking, we got close enough to get a sense of the ice.

Amazing ice.

Amazing ice.

The copper colored dusk stuck around for hours.

The copper colored dusk stuck around for hours.

Lenticular clouds (Altocumulus lenticularis), according to Google, are stationary lens-shaped clouds that form in the troposphere, normally in perpendicular alignment to the wind direction.

Lenticular clouds (Altocumulus lenticularis), according to Google, are stationary lens-shaped clouds that form in the troposphere, normally in perpendicular alignment to the wind direction.

A sign that doesn't exist everywhere. It provided good guidance for us as we explored the Chilean Science Base at Paradise Bay.

A sign that doesn’t exist everywhere. It provided good guidance for us as we explored the Chilean Science Base at Paradise Bay.

This is a Gentoo at Port Lockroy who's covering the chick has his/her partner goes out for food. As you probably know, the mother and father share duties.

This is a Gentoo at Port Lockroy who’s covering the chick has his/her partner goes out for food. As you probably know, the mother and father share duties.

Chinstrap Penguins build their stone nests high up on rocky outcroppings. These guys are at Halfmoon Island.

Chinstrap Penguins build their stone nests high up on rocky outcroppings. These guys are at Halfmoon Island.

Meat Bars were the only food for months on end for scientists until very recently. This one is at the museum at Britain's Port Lockroy.

Meat Bars were the only food for months on end for scientists until very recently. This one is at the museum at Britain’s Port Lockroy. I was told this one was probably still good to eat (in a pinch).

The penguins at Mikkelsen Island kept careful watch over our kayaks.

The penguins at Mikkelsen Island kept careful watch over our kayaks.

The sky at Halfmoon Island changed by the second.

The sky at Halfmoon Island changed by the second.

The water was always changing.

The water was also constantly changing.

This little "marsh" was a haven for seals, sea birds, and penguins.

This little “marsh” was a haven for seals, sea birds, and penguins.

At Port Lockroy, we were able to walk across the sea ice. We were told it was rare to be able to do it so late in the season.

At Port Lockroy, we were able to walk across the sea ice. We were told it was rare to be able to do it so late in the season.

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1 Response

  1. January 29, 2016

    […] a preview, talked about the Wildlife, the History, and the Science and shared some of my favorite photos. Today, I’d like to tell you about […]

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